Statistical research of online dating

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By now, chances are pretty good that you’ve tried online dating at some point, whether it’s on your computer or via your smartphone.With the New Year right around the corner, what happens to online dating on January 1? It blows up."The beginning of a new year is the busiest time for Plenty Of Fish, and the first Sunday of the year always brings the largest surge in signups and site traffic," Shannon Smith, Communications Manager at Plenty Of Fish (POF), tells Bustle.

With many people ready to recommit themselves to finding someone special after the holidays, it's a great time to be looking for love."Sound familiar? According to findings by the Pew Research Center, 15 percent of adults reported using online dating sites or mobile dating apps last year.

— that online dating “works.” This much should be obvious: We don’t actually know.

Some of the reasons for that ambiguity are clear in this latest study.

Reassuringly, catfishing – being tricked into a romantic online relationship with someone who has a fake online identity – was rarely encountered in Australia (12 percent) and almost half (48 percent) realised they were a victim at the point when the other person refused to meet them in person.

“Online dating can be a fantastic service for those seeking a relationship, but large online communities also make them an attractive target for scammers,” said Melissa Dempsey, Senior Director, Norton Business Unit, Asia Pacific and Japan, Symantec.

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